The Gift of Un-Certaintly

February 20, 2015

Yesterday, the first day of Lent, I gave up the Fear of Uncertainty.  It is a fear with which I am familiar, having taken up precious space in the suitcase I carry with me on my trek. My suitcase is most definitely of the carry-on sort, as it comes with me wherever I go.  There is only so much room allotted, so tending to the contents is essential.  Anything I carry that is not useful (like my angst over the unpredictable nature of life) prevents me from packing something else.  Every item that holds me back, gets in my way, makes me less rather than more, complicates rather than simplifies, is excess baggage.  The weight of carrying all that useless stuff that I stuff into my stuff sack?  It weighs me down, wastes precious time and wears me out.

On this second day of Lent and first full day of traveling without it, it dawned on me that with the fear of uncertainty no longer taking up real estate in my bag, something new could take its place.  What to pack instead?  And then it hit me.   Could I find the courage to pack Un-Certainty?

Certainty means I know it all. (Been there.)

Uncertainty means I don’t have a clue. (Done that.)

But Un-Certainty?  Oh… I like the sound of that.

Un-Certainty gives me the choice to toggle between the known and the unknown, and not get stuck-in-the mud of either.

Un-Certainty allows me to navigate off the map and into the mystery.

Un-Certainty pushes me to explore and experiment, expand and experience.

Un-Certainty  leads me to wonder and wander and wrestle and wrangle.

Un-Certainty makes me humble and open to receiving the new.

Un-Certainty helps me seek forgiveness and extend grace.

Un-Certainty transforms fear into faith, which seems like the perfect traveling companion during Lent.  Or any other time for that matter.

Screen Shot 2015-02-19 at 4.31.23 PM

Advertisements

What If We Were “PERFECT”

February 26, 2010

I recently read a book by Geneen Roth, Feeding the Hungry Heart. She is amazing and every person should read her. She speaks to the human condition regardless of the condition a human is in. She dares to suggest that we might consider that we are ENOUGH just the way we are. That if we accept where we have been, what we have accomplished or not,  the insecurities we carry, what we weight, the mistakes we’ve made; all contribute to exactly where we are supposed to be and who we are supposed to be. By accepting our very flawed selves as ADEQUATE, we could possibly  eliminate the ever-present whispering voice of anxiety. The voice that requires so much  attention trying to figure out how to create something different from what we really are.   MISTAKES and IMPERFECTIONS  are abundant.  But there isn’t one that doesn’t offer the opportunity to move ahead.  If we worried  less about what should have been, or how we should be different, we might just find the brain cells to be more content with all the amazing things we truly are. Imagine replacing the voice that says you are inadequate with the voice that says  I AM ENOUGH!
Artist Lynn Hoppe     http://lynnehoppe.blogspot.com/